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Emerald Isle

Level 9 Computing info 1984

Aka:
Island
Language:
English
Authors:
Pete Austin info, Shaun D. Abbott
Systems:
A-code info
Platforms:
Amstrad CPC info, Atari 400/800, BBC/Electron info, C64/128 info, Enterprise info, Memotech MTX info, MSX, Spectrum
Genres:
Treasure hunt
Entered by:
Gunness, Manuel Schulz
Added:
10-05-2010
Edited:
18-12-2014

Synopsis

Plot

You play the part of an aircraft pilot, employed to ferry urgent 'documents' around the Carribean. Fierce winds seize the 'plane over the Bermuda Triangle and hurl it to destruction; you escape by parachute at the last moment.
As you float down towards an island below, you recognise the coastline from an old map. It is the lonely atoll, "Emerald Isle", which few people visit and from which none return.
It is said that only one person may leave - the ruler of the land -and that each visitor is tested. Success promotes you to King or Queen, failure promotes you to the next life.
Explore peculiar towns, meet peculiar people, learn the peculiar purpose of the 'letters' and travel on a railway which is simplicity itself compared to BR's peculiar fare system. Don't be too afraid of the dark, and watch out for the spider!

Notes

This is a large game with many fairly unrelated locations and puzzles.

EI was at some point meant to be the first game in the same trilogy as Red Moon and The Price of Magik.

According to an interview in Micro Adventurer, the game was originally to feature a cannibal cook pot scene. This was removed late in the design phase as it might be deemed racist.

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Images

Image
Emerald_Isle_msx.png EmeraldIsle.gif EmeraldIsle.gif

Rating

Average User Rating: 6 (1 rating)

Your Rating: —

User Comments

Gunness (25-01-2011 11:46)

E.I. was sold at a lower price than the usual Level 9 titles, and I think it shows to some extent. The game is large but the location layout seems a bit random at times, and the puzzles range from the obscure to the uninspired.